how do you calculate the weight of an object if you know its mass in kilograms?

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Offline brstamper

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How do you calculate the weight of an object if you know its mass in kilograms?

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Offline Kryptid

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Simple enough. Weight is the force created between two objects that have mass. In Earth's gravity at sea level, 1 kilogram of mass equals about 2.2 pounds of weight. On other planets, this would differ. On the Moon, there is about 1 sixth of Earth's gravity. Therefore, an object with 1 kilogram of mass would weigh about 0.367 pounds.
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Offline SquarishTriangle

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Isn't weight measured in Newtons?

Force (weight) is approximately 9.8 times the mass in kilograms.

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Offline brstamper

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Thank you for replying!




Simple enough. Weight is the force created between two objects that have mass. In Earth's gravity at sea level, 1 kilogram of mass equals about 2.2 pounds of weight. On other planets, this would differ. On the Moon, there is about 1 sixth of Earth's gravity. Therefore, an object with 1 kilogram of mass would weigh about 0.367 pounds.

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Offline brstamper

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Isn't weight measured in Newtons?

Force (weight) is approximately 9.8 times the mass in kilograms.
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lyner

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Imperial never really got the mass weight thing sorted.
Pounds weight and pounds force and poundals, ergs dynes Owch.
SI makes it simple. You must NEVER have a weight of 1.5kg except when you go shopping for potatoes. I was once asked to leave when I asked for 20Newtons of apples.
Weight is a force and is measured in Newtons always (except in a shop).
Mass is force/acceleration and is measured in kg.
Funny thing.
1kg weighs 10N when you are 14
1kg weighs 9.8N when you are 17
and
1kg weighs 9.81N when you grow up

Now that's standardisation?
And PI = 22/7, I'm told

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Offline DoctorBeaver

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Imperial never really got the mass weight thing sorted.
Pounds weight and pounds force and poundals, ergs dynes Owch.
SI makes it simple. You must NEVER have a weight of 1.5kg except when you go shopping for potatoes. I was once asked to leave when I asked for 20Newtons of apples.
Weight is a force and is measured in Newtons always (except in a shop).
Mass is force/acceleration and is measured in kg.
Funny thing.
1kg weighs 10N when you are 14
1kg weighs 9.8N when you are 17
and
1kg weighs 9.81N when you grow up

Now that's standardisation?
And PI = 22/7, I'm told

 [???]
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Offline Bored chemist

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It makes sense to order apples by mass because that's what you actually want. If you were on the moon would you eat a larger number of apples just because they weighed less?
Please disregard all previous signatures.

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lyner

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agreed but they don't ask you what mass you want and nor do your friends ask you what your mass is. The word everyone uses is 'weight', which varies from place to place.