which gas has the higher breakdown voltage helium or oxygen ?

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Offline taregg

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for light tube gas discharge
« Last Edit: 20/01/2012 14:06:38 by taregg »

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Offline taregg

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can you answer  quickly

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Offline Bored chemist

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Please disregard all previous signatures.

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Offline taregg

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‏  can you explain depends of what.......

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Offline CliffordK

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If you look at the graph from the Wikipedia that BC gave.



O2 is not listed. 
However, compare the curves for N2 and He.

The X axis of the graph shows a product of the (pressure * distance) separating the electrode plates.

For all higher pressures and wider gaps, Helium hits the bottom of the list.  I.E.  The lowest breakdown voltage.

However, there is a point with low pressures and narrow gaps, that Helium performs better than most other gases, except for Hydrogen.

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Offline taregg

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what makes elements of gases low or high  break down voltage from same of atom structure...
« Last Edit: 23/01/2012 21:18:34 by taregg »

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Offline CliffordK

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BC will have to give a better answer.

It appears as if the chart on the left side is dominated by atomic/molecular size.

On the right, it appears to be dominated more by electronegative, and "free" electrons, but I would need more data to confirm.  Surprisingly the Helium which is one of the least electronegative elements is at the bottom of the graph.

I would be curious about more gases, chlorine, fluorine, oxygen, methane, and etc.
« Last Edit: 23/01/2012 22:41:39 by CliffordK »