Why are peninsulas attached to land at their northern end?

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Mark

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Mark asked the Naked Scientists:
   
If you look at a globe, there are several very large peninsulas - Korea, Thailand, Florida, Baja California, Italy. All of these seem to be attached to the mainland at the northern end of the peninsula - why?

What do you think?

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Offline chris

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Why are peninsulas attached to land at their northern end?
« Reply #1 on: 04/06/2009 23:05:42 »
Hmm - that's a good question - although Cape York, Australia, is at the top of a very long south-attached peninsula, and I'm sure there must be more examples...
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Offline Don_1

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Why are peninsulas attached to land at their northern end?
« Reply #2 on: 05/06/2009 08:14:49 »
Just mussing here, might this have something to do with the fact that most of the land mass is in the northern hemisphere?
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Offline LeeE

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Why are peninsulas attached to land at their northern end?
« Reply #3 on: 05/06/2009 16:03:27 »
I'm with Don_1 on this - most of the land mass is in the northern hemisphere.  It's interesting how the 'pointy' bits of South America, Africa and the Indian subcontinent all point south.  The Yucatan peninsula is quite a large North-pointing peninsula though.
...And its claws are as big as cups, and for some reason it's got a tremendous fear of stamps! And Mrs Doyle was telling me it's got magnets on its tail, so if you're made out of metal it can attach itself to you! And instead of a mouth it's got four arses!