Grasses are genetic thieves

22 February 2019
Presented by Jenny Gracie.

BARLEY-FIELD

The image shows a field of grass.

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Scientists have discovered that some grass species have information in their genes that’s not come from their parents, and instead think they’re stealing genetic information from neighbouring plants. By genetically enhancing themselves, they gain a competitive edge, which helps them thrive in more challenging environments. The species Alloteropsis semialata, a type of tropical grass found in Africa, Asia and Australia, has changed the way it produces energy, a process known as photosynthesis.  Jenny Gracie spoke with Luke Dunning from the University of Sheffield, to find out how these plants are changing...

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